jaggery (gur)

jaggery (gur)
Author: EIRI Books
ISBN: PROJECT REPORT
Availability: In Stock
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GUR (JAGGERY) [EIRI/EDPR/1300] (J.C.9962)

Capacity: 1800 MT/Year
Land Area (3 Acre) Cost of land and building: Rs. 3.50 Cr.
Plant and Machinery: Rs. 97 Lacs
Project Cost with Land, Building, Machinery and Working Capital: Rs. 5.50 Cr.

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION
PROPERTIES
USES & APPLICATION
B.I.S. SPECIFICATIONS
MARKET SURVEY
PRESENT MANUFACTURERS OF JAGGERY
VARIETIES OF SUGARCANE
PROCESS OF MANUFACTURE
PROCESS FLOWSHEET OF GUR/JAGGERY MANUFACTURING
PRINCIPLES OF PLANT LAYOUT
PLANT LOCATION FACTORS
EXPLANATION OF TERMS USED IN THE PROJECT REPORT
PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULES
PLANT LAYOUT
PLANT AND MACHINERY SUPPLIERS FOR JAGGERY
SUPPLIERS OF RAW MATERIALS

APPENDIX – A

 1.  COST OF PLANT ECONOMICS
 2.  LAND & BUILDING
 3.  PLANT AND MACHINERY
 4.  FIXED CAPITAL INVESTMENT
 5.  RAW MATERIAL
 6.  SALARY AND WAGES
 7.  UTILITIES AND OVERHEADS
 8.  TOTAL WORKING CAPITAL
 9.  COST OF PRODUCTION
10.  PROFITABILITY ANALYSIS
11.  BREAK EVEN POINT
12.  RESOURCES OF FINANCE
13.  INTEREST CHART
14.  DEPRECIATION CHART
15.  CASH FLOW STATMENT
16.  PROJECTED BALANCE SHEET

Jaggery or gur is a specific type of sugar popular in India. It is normally manufactured from either sugar cane or date palms, but recent trends in its manufacture have resulted in jaggery made from the sap of coconut and sago palms. While jaggery is useful in cooking, it is also an ancient part of Ayurvedic medicine and has spiritual significance in India too.

This type of sugar is considered unrefined and is produced by boiling raw sugar cane or palm juice in iron pans. It is then formed into blocks. Because it does not go through additional processing, it does retain some of the natural vitamins and minerals of the ingredients used, though boiling the juice does deplete some of these. Many people do consider jaggery healthier than more refined sugar since it is less stripped of natural nutrients.

In traditional Indian medicine, called Ayurveda, this sugar has several purposes. It may be prescribed for use for people with sore throats. It has some use in the treatment of bronchial or lung infections, and in fact in research has shown to possibly offset some of the lung damage caused by silicosis, a disease of the lungs that occurs when people are exposed for a long time to silica powder.

     When   sugar  from  sugarcane  was  introduced   cannot   be definitely stated, but brown sugar or gur (Jaggery) was the first known  form of sugar manufactured from sugarcane as well as  from wild  date  palm  (phonnix sulvestris),  palmyra  palm  (Borassus
flapellifar),  toddy  palm (Caryota urens) and other  palms  that contain  12-14%  sugar  in  their sap  tapped  for  the  purpose. Fermented  toddy  sap yields a beverage commonly used  in  India. About  one  lakh tonnes of brown sugar or gur is  still  produced from  palm sap in India. Gur has always been and is  still  being recommended  in Ayurvedic Medicinal system for nutritive  quality and  as a much safer form of sugar than pure white  (centrifugal) sugar  for regular consumption. In the Indian  sub-continent  the gur  is commonly used in preference to molasses free white  sugar for  many  sweet prepartions because of its  specific  taste.  In fact,  the  findings of a British scientist,  John  Yadkin,  have shown  that heavy consumption of highly clarified white sugar  or pure  sucrose  obtained from the modern sugar  mills  is  largely responsible  for  hyperinsinulism and coronary heat  diseases  in human beings. Gur is safe from this aspect.

     Gur (Jaggery) Gur (jaggery) production in India is more than 1.5 times of that of white sugar production (a decade back it was double). Nearly half of the total cane production is utilised for gur produced by open pan method; its production by vacuum process has  not been yet successful. Gur production is 10-12% from  cane in open pan and about 15% in vacuum process. Even at higher price than  white sugar the gur (that contains 70-75%  sucrose,  14-16% invert  sugars, 5% moisture, and 5% other ash creating  material) is still preferred for many special dishes and also in daily use. Besides  Indian many countries of Central Americal  (Costa  Rica, Mexico),  sough Americal (Brazil, Columbia) and  Asia  (including Pakistan,  Indonesia,  Japan) use this  kind  of  non-crystalline sugar  called variously (Repodura, Chancaca, Pancoa,  Mascasvado, Popiton, Jaggery, etc.) Asian countries are the largest consumers (80-) of these forms of sugar

 

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